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Dog Crate Styles and Sizing

Dog Crate Guide

Contents


Wood Dog Crate Styles

Front Entry Used often as an end or side table next to chairs and couches.

Oak and Maple Dog Crates
Solid Oak or
Solid Maple
Mahogany Dog Crate
Mahogany
Brass Rods
Oak Dog Crate
Oak and Stainless
Steel Rods
Wood and Wire Dog Crate
Wood with
Wire Mesh
Wood and Wire Dog Crate
Wood Table over
Wire Cage

Side Entry Often placed along a wall.

Oak and Maple Dog Crates
Solid Oak or
Solid Maple
Wood and Wire Dog Crate
Wood with
Wire Mesh
Wood and Wire Dog Crate
Wood Table over
Wire Cage

Crate Size by Weight or Breed

This guide is based on dog weight and breed. Please use this as a guide and approximation only.

Dogs up to 25 lbs - Small Crate 18" W x 24" L Only available standard as Wood Table over Wire Cage or contact us for information on our other styles.
Chihuahua, Pug, Shih Tzu, Yorkshire Terrier, Australian Terrier, Bichon Frise, Border Terrier, Boston Terrier, Brussles Griffon, Chinese Crested, Fox Terrier, Jack Russell Terrier, Japanese Chin, Maltese, Manchester Terrier, Miniature Dachshund, Miniature Poodle, Norwich Terrier, Papillon, Pomeranian, Silky Terrier, Tibetan Terrier, Toy Fox Terrier

Dogs 26 to 40 lbs - Medium Crate 21" W x 30" L
American Water Spaniel, Australian Terrier, Basenji, Bedlington Terrier, Bichon Frise, Border Terrier, Boston Terrier, Brussels Griffon, Cairn Terrier, Chinese Crested, Clumber Spaniel, Dachshund, Fox Terrier, French Bulldog, Jack Russell Terrier, Japanese Chin, King Charles Spaniel, Lhasa Apso, Maltese, Manchester Terrier, Miniature Dachshund, Miniature Pinscher, Miniature Poodle, Miniature Schnauzer, Norwich Terrier, Papillon, Pekingese, Pomeranian, Scottish Terrier, Shetland Sheepdog, Silky Terrier, Tibetan Terrier, Toy Fox Terrier, Welsh Springer Spaniel, Welsh Terrier, West Highland Terrier

Dogs 41 to 70 lbs - Large Crate 24" W x 36" L
American Eskimo, American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, Australian Cattle Dog, Basset Hound, Beagle, Brittany Spaniel, Bull Terrier, Bulldog, Chinese Shar-Pei, Cocker Spaniel, English Setter, English Springer Spaniel, Finnish Spitz, Harrier, Keeshond, Kerry Blue Terrier, Norwegian Elkhound, Portuguese Water Dog, Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier, Welsh Corgi, Whippet

Dogs 71 to 90 lbs - Extra Large Crate 28" W x 42" L
Airedale Terrier. Australian Shepherd, Bearded Collie, Belgian Malinois, Belgian Sheepdog, Belgian Tervuren, Border Collie, Boxer, Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Chow-Chow, Dalmation, Golden Retriever, Ibizan Hound, Irish Setter, Irish Water Spaniel, Labrador Retriever, Rhodesian Ridgeback, Saluki, Standard Poodle, Standard Schnauzer, Vizsla

Dogs 91 to 110 lbs - 2X Large Crate 30" W x 48" L Only available standard as Wood Table over Wire Cage or contact us for information on our other styles.
Afghan, Alaskan Malamute, Anatolian Shepherd, Bernese Mountain Dog, Bloodhound, Bouvier Des Flandres, Briard, Bullmastiff, Collie, Doberman Pinscher, Dogue De Bordeaux, German Shepherd, Giant Schnauzer, Gordon Setter, Greyhound, Komondor, Kuvasz, Old English Sheepdog, Otterhound, Rottweiler, Samoyed, Siberian Husky, Weimaraner

Dogs 110+ lbs - 3X Large Special order, please contact us information.
Borzoi, Great Dane, Great Pyrenees, Irish Wolfhound, Mastiff, Neapolitan Mastiff, Newfoundland, Scottish Deerhound, Saint Bernard


Crate Size by Dog's Height and Length

Sizing Guide:
Measure dog's height to the shoulders, and length from chest to rear of leg
Add 4"-6" to each measurement. For approximation only.

Dog Crate Sizing Guide 18" W x 24" L - Small Crate
21" W x 30" L - Medium Crate
24" W x 36" L - Large Crate
28" W x 42" L - Extra Large Crate
30" W x 48" L - 2X Large Crate


Why Crate Train

When you use a crate, you give your puppy a place to feel secure...something to get his back up against. He won't feel isolated because the pet home provides essential visibility & ventilation. Just like a baby in a playpen. You will also be taking advantage of his natural instinct to keep his home clean, therefore, when he has to "go" he will try to hold it until you can take him outside to the proper area. This will teach him a schedule and help him eliminate accidents.


How To Crate Train

Step 1: Acquaint your puppy with his new home

Simply start from early puppyhood and have your puppy sleep and rest in his home. Almost without trying he will train himself to seek security and comfort inside his little "dog room."

Encourage your puppy to go into his home on his own. If necessary, toss a little treat in the home. DON'T FORCE HIM! He may quickly back out or be shy, but that's normal. Just take it slowly. At first, don't close the door on him, let him go in and out on his own.

Once he is happy and unafraid of his new home, simply restrain him at the door with your hand. Make him stay in the home for a few minutes, then gradually increase the time and be sure to praise him!

Once he is comfortable with this, (probably a few hours or days of short training sessions) simply restrain him at the door with the door, again praising him lavishly. Soon he will be secure in his home with the door closed. Slowly you can get further and further away from him, always praising his accepting behavior. Eventually, the pup will sit quietly and sleep in his home with the door closed.

Step 2: Direct his elimination

Understand that little puppies need to "go" about every 2 to 4 hours. On a schedule, (such as after feeding, before bedtime, first thing in morning) let your puppy out, teach him the route to the door, praise him at the door and take him out to the part of the yard you want him to use. Very quickly, you are teaching him an elimination schedule that will stay with him for the rest of his life.

As your puppy gets older (4-6 months) you can gradually leave him in his home for longer periods of time because he can "hold it" longer. Soon he can be home in his home all day, if necessary, until someone arrives to let him out.


Some of the DO's and DON'Ts of Crate Training

DO...
...buy a crate large enough for your dog when he grows up. However, if the home is too big when your pup is small, he may eliminate in one corner, then go to another corner to sleep. Divider Panels are available to solve this problem.
...get your pup used to his new home gradually.
...provide soft, washable bedding in the home so that it is comfortable and warm. Make the inside of the home as cozy as you can. Keep it clean and free of fleas.
...supervise your pup anytime he is free in your home. Supervision is what allows you to direct behavior. Chewing, elimination, barking, and all other behaviors are all dependent on your direction. If allowed to be unsupervised, he will begin to direct his own behavior and schedule.

DON'T...
...leave your very young pup in his home all day. At 6 weeks, a pup can hold his bladder about 4 hours, by 8 weeks-5 hours, by 12 weeks-6 hours and by 5-6 months a pup should be able to "hold it" for an 8 hour work day.
...put "housebreaking pads" or newspaper in your pet's home. We are trying to take advantage of the pup's natural instinct NOT to go in his home.
...let your new pup roam through your house unsupervised. Keep an eye on him so that when he sniffs and circles (an indication he is about to go) you can quickly and gently guide him to the door and outside.
...force your new pup into the home for the first time. Plan on taking plenty of quality time with him the first few days to get him accustomed to his new surroundings.
...punish your pup by putting or forcing him into his home. Your pup's home should be his secure place, it should not be associated with punishment, fear, or anything negative.


(Some of this information was compiled from data provided by crate manufacturers, breeders & vets.)